YasSarNalQuR'aN

An effort in f a c i l i t a t i o n

Account of Time in the Qur’an

Since ancient times, some nations, such as Egyptians, Romans, Persians and Europeans, adopted the solar year for timing, although they differed in fixing the date for the beginning of years and the number of days in each month, which constituted one part of 12 in each year. Before the advent of Islam, Egyptians made the numbers of days in each month 30, with the addition of 5 or 6 days to the year at the end of it. The lunar calendar known to us now, or the Hijrite Calendar, has not been adopted except after Islam. This is despite the fact that it was followed in pre-Islamic days by the Arabs and certain groups of Jews, as well as in India and China, but in another form.

Attempts were made to unite both solar and lunar calendars at the time when months were nearer to nature represented in the sun and the moon, taking into consideration that the lunar year included 12 lunar months. To achieve this goal, Indians took the moment the crescent appeared in the sky as the beginning of the new year. That was before the coming of the spring. By so doing, they had a year of 12 months, with 30 days in each. Later, the beginning of the year gradually lagged behind the spring, making a difference of one or more than one month. When such a thing occurred they used to adopt a leap year, including 13 months. By this action, one certain month had to be repeated twice.

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June 26, 2010 Posted by | Qur'an and Science | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment